Ron Belinko

Ron Belinko

Advisory Committee Member

Ron Belinko, CMAA, Retired Coordinator of Athletics for Baltimore County Public Schools Maryland oversaw key changes in local high school sports during his 46 year career in education.

Belinko’s
work
at
all
levels
of
high
school
athletics
helped
him
advance
to
several
important
positions
within
the
NFHS
and
the
NIAAA.
A
member
of
the
NFHS
Boys
Lacrosse
Rules
Committee
since
1999,
he
was
appointed
chairman
in
2003.
In
2002,
Belinko
was
named
the
state
Leadership
Training
coordinator,
and
he
has
served
on
national
faculties
for
LTC
507
and
LTC
502.
Belinko
has
spoken
at
ten
NIAAA
National
Conferences
of
High
School
Directors
of
Athletics,
and
has
been
published
in
the
Interscholastic
Athletic
Administration
journal.
Belinko
has
been
equally
dedicated
to
the
Maryland
Public
Secondary
Schools
Athletic
Association
(MPSSAA).
Involved
with
the
association
since
1983,
he
has
served
on
the
MPSSAA’s
executive
council,
and
the
MPSSAA
Board
of
Control.
Belinko
was
inducted
in
the
National
Wrestling
Hall
of
Fame
in
2004,
and
he
was
also
inducted
into
the
Maryland
State
Wrestling
Hall
of
Fame
in
1987,
as
well
as
the
Baltimore
County
Wrestling
Hall
of
Fame.
He
is
a
member
of
the
Eastern
Technical
High
School’s
Athletic
Hall
of
Fame.
Belinko
is
a
graduate
of
the
University
of
Baltimore,
and
he
earned
his
master’s
degree
from
Morgan
State
University.
He
holds
the
designation
as
a
“Certified
Master
Athletic
Administrator”
from
the
National
Certification
board.
In
2011,
he
received
the
National
Interscholastic
Athletic
Administrators’
Association’s
Frank
Kovaleski
Professional
Development
Award.
Belinko
has
been
around
for
many
of
the
landmark
shifts
in
education
that
also
affected
interscholastic
athletics,
including
Title
IX
and
inclusion.
Baltimore
County,
however,
was
ahead
of
the
curve
on
both.
The
county
offered
girls
sports
long
before
the
Title
IX
mandated
them
40
years
ago.
With
the
introduction
of
allied
sports
in
1994,
Belinko
and
then-­‐supervisor
of
athletics
Jill
Masterman,
at
the
request
of
then-­‐county
superintendent
Stuart
Berger,
began
a
program
modeled
on
Special
Olympics.
It
provided
opportunities
for
disabled
students
to
play
beside
non-­‐disabled
students
10
years
before
national
legislation
required
such
programs.